READ THE BILL HERE

Right to Carry FAQ

What is the difference between a concealed carry license, and a basic concealed carry license?  

The concealed carry license stays the same as the license issued by the Department of Justice under current law requiring completion of a training program. In addition to this current license, the bill creates a basic concealed carry license that does not require completion of a training program. To receive either license, DOJ must complete a background check. Both of these licenses are retained despite the fact that they are no longer necessary to carry a firearm in Wisconsin for purposes of reciprocity with other states and minimizing the applicability of federal firearm restrictions.

Under this bill, do I have to have a concealed carry license at all?

No, both licenses are optional. However, a person may choose to obtain one of these licenses for purposes of carrying a firearm in another state or to minimize the applicability of federal firearm restrictions. The only difference between the two licenses is that one has a training program requirement, and the other does not.

Do I need a concealed carry license to carry a handgun in my car?

No. This bill clarifies the law and allows all those legally allowed to possess a handgun to carry in their vehicle, regardless of whether it is concealed or not.

Under this bill, if I currently have a concealed carry license, do I need to obtain a new license?

No.

My employer’s property is posted to prohibit possession of a firearm. Can I leave my firearm in my car?

Yes. Current law allows employees to possess a firearm in a vehicle in parking lots with posted signs prohibiting possession of firearms by their employer if they have a concealed carry license. This bill removes the requirement for this license. This provision applies to all employers.

What is an antique firearm?

For the purposes of the National Firearms Act, the term “Antique Firearms” means any firearm not intended or redesigned for using rim fire or conventional center fire ignition with fixed ammunition and manufactured in or before 1898 (including any matchlock, flintlock, percussion cap or similar type of ignition system or replica thereof, whether actually manufactured before or after the year 1898) and also any firearm using fixed ammunition manufactured in or before 1898, for which ammunition is no longer manufactured in the United States and is not readily available in the ordinary channels of commercial trade. 

Antique firearm also generally includes any muzzleloading rifle, muzzleloading shotgun, or muzzleloading pistol, which is designed to use black powder, or a black powder substitute, and which cannot use fixed ammunition.

Can non-residents of Wisconsin carry their firearm openly or concealed in Wisconsin?

Yes, as long as they are not entering legally posted property prohibiting possession of firearms, and if they are in a school zone, they hold one of the two types of Wisconsin licenses. 

What does this bill change regarding shining?

The bill removes the general prohibition against carrying a firearm while shining wildlife. For example, under current law, if you were to shine the headlights of your vehicle at a deer at night while possessing a firearm in your vehicle, you would be violating current law. Under this bill, situations where you are carrying a firearm and shining (but NOT shooting the firearm) would be allowed.

This bill does NOT allow shining and shooting of any wildlife for which this is not allowed under current law, such as deer and bear.

Does this bill allow for the carrying of firearms in school buildings and on school grounds?

Generally, yes. However, the bill does leave it up to the schools to decide whether carrying a firearm in school buildings or on school grounds is permissible, with one exception. It is important to note that no one is permitted under federal law to carry a firearm in a school zone unless they are licensed by the state in which the school is located. For example;

  1. If you have a Wisconsin concealed carry license and the school does not post signs prohibiting possession of firearms in their buildings and/or grounds:
    1. You would be able to carry a firearm in the school zone.
  2. If you do not have a Wisconsin concealed carry license and the school does not post signs prohibiting possession of firearms in their buildings and/or grounds:
    1. If you do not have a Wisconsin concealed carry license, you cannot carry a firearm in the school zone under federal law. This bill does not and cannot change federal law.
  3. If you have a Wisconsin concealed carry license and the school does post signs prohibiting possession of firearms in their buildings and/or grounds:
    1. You would not be able to carry a firearm in the buildings and/or grounds. However, if the buildings and/or grounds are posted, you are still able to carry a loaded or unloaded firearm in any vehicle driven or parked in a parking facility in school buildings or on school grounds.
  4. If you do not have a Wisconsin concealed carry license and the school does post signs prohibiting possession of firearms in their buildings and/or grounds:
    1. You would not be able to carry a firearm anywhere within the school zone under federal AND state law.

Does this bill allow for carrying of firearms in college buildings and on campus grounds?

Current law allows for colleges and universities to post their buildings. If the building is posted, you cannot enter while carrying a firearm. Current law does not allow for colleges and universities to post their grounds. This bill does not change current law.

Can I carry a firearm openly or concealed into a stadium?

Generally, yes. There is no state prohibition of carrying a firearm in stadiums. However, some stadiums may be legally posted with signs prohibiting possession of firearms, such as stadiums on school grounds, stadiums that are part of special events, stadiums that qualify as buildings, or stadiums that require access to enter through a posted building.